Tix-n-Roo

14,659 notes

color-palettes:

Shout out to this incredible color resource site! They give you anything and everything you could ever want to know about a color from color schemes to RGB percentage makeup. There’s even a color blindness simulator for help with using visible/accessible colors for all viewers.

So keep this site in mind if you’re a graphic designer, interior designer, artist, color enthusiast, or whatever! It’s quite awesome.

0 notes

» Resources

I made a few updates to the Resources page on the main site!

I want the resources page (and eventually, pages) to be the best it can be! I would appreciate it a lot if you could go in and look at it and let us know if there is anything that needs adjusting- if it’s hard to navigate or read, or if there are any links that we should add, we want to know about them!

there are instructions on the page but you can also send us an ask or fanmail or submit and we’ll respond accordingly!

cheers,
roo

8,005 notes

ursulavernon:

perplexingly:

theotherwesley:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.
The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”
You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.
(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

:’D i feel better now

WE HAD THIS FAILING EXERCISE AT SCHOOL - after you don’t succeed very well with arting, make your most successful pose and with your most successful voice say “I FAILED” \ o /

Oh, wow! That sounds fantastic, actually. Wish my drawing class had that. (In ceramics, we could just ritually smash the piece, which was cathartic like whoa.)

ursulavernon:

perplexingly:

theotherwesley:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.

The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”

You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.

(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

:’D i feel better now

WE HAD THIS FAILING EXERCISE AT SCHOOL - after you don’t succeed very well with arting, make your most successful pose and with your most successful voice say “I FAILED” \ o /

Oh, wow! That sounds fantastic, actually. Wish my drawing class had that. (In ceramics, we could just ritually smash the piece, which was cathartic like whoa.)

(via scloutier)

6 notes

Screen Drawing Tablets I Have Known

gonechoo:

I’d like to throw my two cents worth into the ring on this topic as it’s come up a few times, and I’ve had reasonable hands-on experience with this.  I’ve had contact with the following machines and their respective drawing technologies from least to most recent:

Cintiq 15X (Wacom) - 1998-2007 (On Perma-loan)

Advantages: Solid Cintiq Level Quality, two sensor (lavish) pen.

Disads: Utterly a fixed desktop emplacement, requires separate computer for use. Low resolution by today’s standards.

Notes: Bought used in 1998 for $1200.  It was so unergonomic and intimidating, I eventually ended up preferring the Fujitsu P16xx series and gave it to a friend who was a better, more serious artist than I.

Fujitsu P1630 Lifebook (Proprietary Capacitive Touchscreen) 2007-2014 (Backup Role)

Advantages: No special pen required so you can use whatever is comfortable that does not scratch the surface. Uses Win 7. As light as a Surface Pro with the 3 cell battery, and converts into a fully usable netbook sized form factor laptop.

Disadvantages: No pressure sensitivity, somewhat dicey palm check, not multi-touch compatible, somewhat slow by today’s standards (dual core 1.2ghz) but acceptable for drawing tasks. Smallest screen to draw on.

Notes: Some Lifebooks have an active style pen with pressure sensitivity, but not the P16xx series.  You may find some of the other Fujitsu Lifebooks even better, if heavier, than the P16xx series.

HP TX2-1020US Touchsmart Laptop (N-Trig) - Early 2014 (Retired)

Advantages: Reasonably Modern Processor, Short but reasonable one sensor pen, High levels of out-of-the-box accuracy under a fresh install of Windows 7. One of the earliest multi-touch capable laptops. Surprisingly inexpensive used on E-bay.

Disadvantages: Does not have 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity, which likely you’d only notice if you are a cyborg. Will elicit potential whining from people who paid 5 times too much for a Cintiq to get the same general digital art ability. May be a little heavy for tablet aficionados since it is a 12 inch convertible laptop.

Notes: I had a water-damaged unit closed out from work that I was able to do tests on, so I can’t judge for the quality of the hardware outside of the drawing tablet aspects, but in my short time I was fairly impressed.

Microsoft Surface Pro (Wacom) - Late 2014:

Advantages: About the same weight as a P1630 (around a kilogram). Decent Wacom-like response (with edge caveats below). Two sensor (cheap-feeling) pen. Modern processor (i5).

Disads: Windows 8 Only. Has dicey detection at edges. Not user serviceable. Terrible native keyboard connectivity. Is basically a tablet and not a laptop, unless you add peripherals.

Notes: The starting drivers do not give pressure sensitivity in Photoshop, but Wacom’s updated Dualsense drivers will fix that. Possibly the most comfortable machine I’ve used, tied with the Fujitsu P1630 Lifebook. but not the best. Some features of Windows 8 regularly interfere with the function of a screen tablet unintentionally, especially at the edges. With patience, it can be made into a serviceable Cintiq-like tool.

My feelings are that while Wacom was the defacto standard in the 2000s and still a high-quality contender in the current market, they’re vastly over-priced - especially for solo starving digital artists. N-Trig has been making some decent enough hardware since 2009, and there are other options than Cintiqs to be had for screen-drawing. There is no reason for you to be plopping down a grand for one if you do your research.

PS: I had considered a Yiynova DP-10U+, which despite in earlier model (The DP-10U), had seen some promising reviews. It’s a Cintiq-like alternative that one of my friends has as well, but I have no personal experience with it so I can only footnote it.  As of this time, the DP10U+ has been superseded by the MVP10U (renamed possibly dropping the DP to get out of the shadow of the first model) and runs about $300 on amazon. It uses a battery pen and 2 USB connections to run it as a second monitor/digitizer.

561 notes

Look around you: I mean it. Pause, for a moment and look around the room that you are in. I’m going to point out something so obvious that it tends to be forgotten. It’s this: that everything you can see, including the walls, was, at some point, imagined.
Neil Gaiman (via moonhymns)

(Source: seabois, via kosmosxipo)

63 notes

chrisoatley:

This is the first demo for my “How To Paint Stylized Hair” tutorial series which is a part of my digital painting course called The Magic Box.
During the last half of 2014 I have committed to attempting to paint the hardest subjects I can think of. …which includes pop icons. They’re particularly challenging because they are so familiar to all of us.So far, this series includes Elvis and Marilyn Monroe (which I’ll post here in the coming weeks).Although challenging, I’m really happy with how this one turned out.The brushes I used for this painting will soon be available on my website.

chrisoatley:

This is the first demo for my “How To Paint Stylized Hair” tutorial series which is a part of my digital painting course called The Magic Box.

During the last half of 2014 I have committed to attempting to paint the hardest subjects I can think of. …which includes pop icons. They’re particularly challenging because they are so familiar to all of us.

So far, this series includes Elvis and Marilyn Monroe (which I’ll post here in the coming weeks).

Although challenging, I’m really happy with how this one turned out.

The brushes I used for this painting will soon be available on my website.

32 notes

littlefroggies:

Was having trouble making things work when I had a cool idea for chap 9 to introduce a character/setting sooner and couldn’t really reconcile it or get it to make sense without visuals. So this colorful thing happened.

littlefroggies:

Was having trouble making things work when I had a cool idea for chap 9 to introduce a character/setting sooner and couldn’t really reconcile it or get it to make sense without visuals. So this colorful thing happened.

1 note

Art Block Execution #25: Take the First Step
This ABE is all about getting started. Laying the groundwork for the Thing you want to make.
Where other ABEs have been warm-ups, or exercises, or distractions, this one is a Challenge.
We challenge you to take whatever it is you’ve been putting off, and commit the first few lines to paper.
That’s it. You don’t need to finish it- you just need to break the ice.
Put something down, start roughing out a layout. Write a bunch of cusswords on the page so that it’s not blank anymore.
Ideally, get it complete enough that you’d feel okay calling it a First Draft.
And then relax a little, because you got over the first hurdle. The Blank Page cannot defeat you.
Difficulty: 4/5
How Does This Kill Art Block: Like it says on the tin. It’s all about gaining momentum.

We love to see your completed ABEs! You can email them to us at abe@tiix-n-roo.com, or post a reply to this topic! If you have a tumblr, you can post your ABE there (or Submit it to our blog!) and be sure to use our tags, #ABE, #TixNRoo, and #ArtBlockExecution. We’ll post some favorites more or less monthly!
Have an idea for an ABE? Submit it to us!

Art Block Execution #25: Take the First Step

This ABE is all about getting started. Laying the groundwork for the Thing you want to make.

Where other ABEs have been warm-ups, or exercises, or distractions, this one is a Challenge.

We challenge you to take whatever it is you’ve been putting off, and commit the first few lines to paper.

That’s it. You don’t need to finish it- you just need to break the ice.

Put something down, start roughing out a layout. Write a bunch of cusswords on the page so that it’s not blank anymore.

Ideally, get it complete enough that you’d feel okay calling it a First Draft.

And then relax a little, because you got over the first hurdle. The Blank Page cannot defeat you.

Difficulty: 4/5

How Does This Kill Art Block: Like it says on the tin. It’s all about gaining momentum.

We love to see your completed ABEs! You can email them to us at abe@tiix-n-roo.com, or post a reply to this topic! If you have a tumblr, you can post your ABE there (or Submit it to our blog!) and be sure to use our tags, #ABE, #TixNRoo, and #ArtBlockExecution. We’ll post some favorites more or less monthly!

Have an idea for an ABE? Submit it to us!

Filed under abe art block art block execution tix n roo tixnroo art sketch getting started just do it