Tix-n-Roo

3 notes

occoris:

Yo hey i know i have some friends/followers/peeps who do less-mainstream kinds of arts.

If you have a thing that you do (knitting, music, sculpting, w/e) that doesn’t see as many or as good of quality tutorials and support as, say, drawing does, can you hit me up?

I am trying to expand the resources section of the tix-n-roo site and we are severely lacking in content for- actually a lot of things. 

additionally, if you have any exercises that would make decent Art Block killers (they can be mostly for a specific medium or bonus points for able to be modified to apply to one or more other things) we are also always in need of those! a lot of the time they’re mostly just warm-ups or things that make you think outside of the box just a little, or small projects to help expand skillsets.

http://tix-n-roo.com/

or just generally anything that you think should be on the site that isn’t there, i’d love to hear about it!

301 notes

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

30 notes

Interleaved RAW files and shit

eusociality:

hedgehodge-monster:

Okay I think I’m going to make a shitty post about a trick I really like abusing when I make glitchy stuff.

I haven’t seen a post or anything about it and it’s hard for me to describe what I’m doing whenever I show this trick to someone so I’m just gonna make this for myself or whatever

Bluh, okay so I open an image in PS…

image

Save that shit as an interleaved header-less RAW file

image

Then open the RAW image file….

image

alright then, now you get a window like this

image

You put in the size of the original picture, 3 channels, 8-bit, and oh yeah, don’t tick that interleaved box.

image

Well, there you go. What you do with this afterwards is up to you

BRB glitching every image on my computer.

(Source: hedgehodgemonster)

3,881 notes

How to help out your favorite artists when you don’t have any money

sparklermonthly:

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY of those things to help us out! Eyeballs on artwork is what we want, and just that is really helpful. But there are lots of other, free things you can do, if you want to, that will help us.

  • You can reblog our work, with credit! Tumblr, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, showing people next to you in class or at the library, whatever. The more you reblog our stuff, any kind of stuff, and especially if it has a name and/or link attached, the more followers we get, the happier we are, and the easier we can sell art and pay rent. This is such a vital part of our continued existence and it is difficult to overstate how grateful we are when it happens.

  • You can like, comment, subscribe on Youtube, reply on Twitter, and generally make our little numbers go up. Even if you don’t want a drawing on your blog, hitting “Like” helps. If people are browsing your liked posts (if you have this option available in your sidebar or in a separate page) they will see our work. Additionally, higher note counts translate instantly to “more worthy of being looked at” when parsed by an idle, browsing brain. That’s the price of being a member of a social species, and it stinks because it doesn’t reflect “quality” or “innate value” of art, whatever that is, but a post with 4 digit notes is going to get more positive regard than a post with a 2 digit notecount. And really, it makes sense. If lots of people like a thing, it is likely, if only statistically, that you will too. 

  • You can talk about your favorite artists to your friends. A lot of us idle on skype and irc all day, talking about new album releases and games and twitter beef. It doesn’t occur to a lot of us to talk about how so-and-so just did a cartoon of a fat bird that is making our day slightly better, but that URL pastes just as easily into the chat as any other. Don’t be annoying about it, but like Homeland Security always says, if you see something, say something!

  • You can look at/click the ads on our websites. You can disable AdBlock on our websites, too. I have two little Project Wonderful boxes at the top of my blog. They pay me very little per day, but when I need $20 to stop an overdraft fee or buy a food, Project Wonderful has my back. This has happened about a dozen times, enough to teach me the value of having that last, tiny bit of cash just slowly snowballing in the background.

There is probably other stuff that I’m forgetting, so please feel free to reblog and add them.

also personally I am nuts about getting comments on the site because people talking about the comic is the actual BEST

This applies to small publishing companies, too! ^_^  Following our Facebook and Tumblr, reblogging/sharing our links, and stopping by the forums to tell our artists how much you’re enjoying their work means the world to us even when you can’t contribute financially. (We’ve all been there…)

3,795 notes

Em Dashes

thecharactercomma:

A lot of people use semi-colons wrong because they know there’s supposed to be a pause in their sentence that they know isn’t quite a comma, so they think it must be that mysterious semi-colon. Usually, it’s actually supposed to be an em dash (—), which in some ways is more mysterious!

The em dash is the longest of the three dashes and most often used for interruptions. Interruptions in speech, in action, in thought. It’s also a great syntax addition for fight scenes, since it makes the narrative seem quick and unexpected and jolting from side to side like a fight scene should be. Read your em dash sentences out loud until you get a feel for how its pause compares to the pause of a comma. It’s a heartbeat longer. If a comma is one beat of pause, then I see an em dash as two beats of pause.

In this first example, the em dash is used to give an aside to the reader. It’s like a btw sort of moment, which can sometimes be replaced with commas or parenthesis. I think the em dashes are most suitable when your aside is decently long.

Her neighbor, Frank, is always blasting music.

Her neighbor—the one who always blasts the music—is named Frank.

My mischievous neighbor, Vince, seemed to have a knack for graveyard cavorting.

Vince—more often called (in a raised and angry voice) Vincent Price Ramsey—seemed to have a knack for graveyard cavorting.

Next up, here’s the em dash as a replacement for the semi-colon. Kinda like a slang or shortened sentence. Semi-colons have to connect two independent clauses—meaning each side of the semi-colon could stand alone as its own complete sentence. If you don’t want to do that, try an em dash:

I thought hanging out would be great—a chance to finally see the city, just like Aunt Lillian wanted.

I thought hanging out would be great; it would be a chance to finally see the city, just like Aunt Lillian wanted.

There was a headstone hardly a foot from where I’d emerged—dark grey stone a few inches thick and maybe as high as my knee.

There was a headstone hardly a foot from where I’d emerged; it was made of dark grey stone a few inches thick and maybe as high as my knee.

Sometimes, you can use an em dash to have a speaker correct themselves, or interrupt themselves to amend their sentence.

I could see the blur of the graveyard behind him—through him—

Similar to the last example, it can be used to interrupt a sentence in order to add additional information about the sentence. Often you can use a comma in this situation, too, so try to think of syntax and how that additional beat of pause changes things. In this case, Alice has just seen a ghost for the first time, so her mind is a bit too shocked for the normal pause of a comma. Read both. Doesn’t the one with the em dash sound more shocked or surprised, while the comma makes it sound like a simple observation?

He was glowing pale—almost tinged in cold blue.

He was glowing pale, almost tinged in cold blue.

Of course, it could be an interruption. It could be someone interrupting another in speech, one action interrupting another, or a character’s thoughts interrupting themselves. Here I’ll include the sentence with the em dash and the sentence following, so you can see the thing interrupted and the interruption.

You can have an action interrupt a character’s thoughts. For the first one, Alice is in a creepy situation and completely focused on something else, so when something touches her elbow, she’s shocked out of her thoughts. For the second one, Tristan is listening for an enemy when the enemy makes a move and startles him into action.

As far as I could tell it was some kind of berry—

An icy contact on my elbow broke my resolve, and I screamed until an equally cold hand clamped over my mouth.

The night was still, and yet—

Something whistled through the air. Tristan jerked backwards, narrowly avoiding an incoming dagger.

Here we have one character interrupting another in dialogue. Pretty self-explanatory.

“I’m not going to—”

Mom’s voice in the receiver cut me off. “At least consider it.”

“After all, you’re only a—”

“If you even say girl,” I interrupted, “I’ll stab you, I swear.”

The next one is part of a fight scene, so Alice’s thoughts are interrupting themselves as soon as she thinks them. She throws up an idea, “iron,” but interrupts herself from further exploring that idea, and instead casts it out. In a fight, you don’t have time to think out long, eloquent ideas. Your thoughts should come in fragments. Stab. Punch. Dodge. Swing. Would this work? No. How about this? Maybe. The em dash can help get across this uneven jolting of thoughts.

Iron—no use. I’d dropped the knife when her damn vines ensnared me, and the nails were in my pockets and out of reach. Blood—there were possibilities there.

Continuing in fight scenes, em dashes can have action interrupt action. Don’t just throw them in willy nilly, but if you have a chance for an em dash, jump on it. Instead of a word like “suddenly,” it makes it feel suddenly. Ups the tension. Em dashes are about interruption, and what is a fight scene but two people interrupting each other’s attempts to kill the other? This is especially useful for the last line in a paragraph during a fighting scene, because it’s a nice place to have one action interrupt another.

I snatched it—slit across my hand—

And stabbed her through the heart.

His swords whistled through the air—

A clean “X” appeared on the imp’s back, severing its body into four neat chunks.

So yeah, I’m basically obsessed with em dashes and I use more of them than the majority of writers. (At 72k words, my current project has 22 semi-colons and 344 em dashes. So. Yeah. Not to mention the length of this post…) Em dashes are way cool and can add a lot to your writing even though they’re just another form of punctuation. Syntax helps your reader into the mindset you’re going for, and em dashes can be a great, powerful part of that syntax!

—E

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

23,901 notes

color-palettes:

Shout out to this incredible color resource site! They give you anything and everything you could ever want to know about a color from color schemes to RGB percentage makeup. There’s even a color blindness simulator for help with using visible/accessible colors for all viewers.

So keep this site in mind if you’re a graphic designer, interior designer, artist, color enthusiast, or whatever! It’s quite awesome.